Allied activities News


Agriculture allied activities 

Allied activities are the important components of the agriculture sector and have a high revenue earning potential which is still not fully utilised in India. In this section, we will provide you with updates on allied activities of the agriculture sector.

Allied activities News/updates

Challenges Facing Dairy Sector in India – Explained, Pointwise

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Introduction

World Milk Day was celebrated on 1st June while National Milk day is celebrated on 26th November. Both days recognize the importance of milk for the health and well-being of an individual. Apart from nutritional benefits for health, the dairy sector in India is a crucial source of employment generation and a steady income for the majority of small and marginal farmers.

The sector has been performing well since the onset of operation flood in the 1970s. It is testified by India’s occupation of top spot in terms of milk production. However, acquisition of a top position doesn’t mean the sector is devoid of challenges. Indian dairy farmers are dealing with fragmented supply chains, poor returns, and high price sensitivity, all of which make the sector less lucrative. 

Furthermore, the pandemic has created additional stress on the sector that demands immediate reform to enhance the income potential and resilience in the sector.

About the Dairy Sector in India
  • Dairy is one of the biggest agri- businesses in India and a significant contributor to the Indian economy. 
  • It is the largest single agricultural commodity with a 4 % share in the economy. 
  • India is the largest producer of milk globally with 188 million MT production in 2019-20. It produces over one-fifth of the global milk production
    • Organizations like Amul, Mother Dairy, Kwality Limited, etc. have played a pivotal role in expanding the production. Amul today has over 3.6 million milk producers nationwide.
    • Further, there has been a proliferation of private dairy enterprises that now account for more than 60 % of dairy processing capacity in the country.
  • In the Gross Value Added (GVA) from agriculture, the livestock sector contributed 28 percent in 2019-20. Further, India witnesses a 6% growth rate in milk production every year.
  • The dairy sector serves a wide range of consumer needs too – from protein supplements and health foods to indulgence foods such as yogurt and ice creams.
Significance of the Dairy Sector in India
  • Tackling agricultural uncertainties: Farmers keep 2-5 milk animals for livelihood. They provide great support to them, especially during drought and flood. Further, dairying is not a seasonal occupation in nature, like agriculture.
  • Nutritional Support: The milk and associated products have immensely helped India in reducing the malnutrition and undernourishment levels in the country. Thus, the dairy sector is indispensable for meeting the nutritional requirement of the country’s rising population. 
  • Employment Generation: It is a significant contributor to farmers’ income as approximately 70 million farmers are directly involved in dairying.
  • Reduces Import Bill: Operation Flood (also called as White Revolution) converted India from a milk importer to the world’s largest producer.
    • The program launched in 1970 and adopted a multi-pronged approach. This included tax incentives, food quality standards, subsidies on inputs, infrastructure provisions such as cold chain and electrification. 
    • All this helped in reducing import bills and made India an exporter. The country exported dairy products worth $187 Million in 2019-20.  
  • Women Empowerment: Female population comprises around 69% of the sector’s workforce. They are dependent on the sector for their livelihood. Therefore, the dairy sector’s development automatically augments women’s empowerment. 
  • Boosting other sectors: The dairy sector provides cow dung which is used as an organic manure for the agricultural sector. Further, the sector provides raw materials to manufacture processed foods. 
    • For instance, the whey protein powder is an extract from the watery portion of milk that separates from the curds during the cheese-making process.
How did the pandemic impact the dairy sector in India?
  • In the first wave, agriculture and allied sectors put up a spectacular performance. It showed an annual growth of 3.4 % while the economy contracted by (-)7.2 % in 2020-21. 
  • However, the dairy sector could not replicate this good performance in the second wave.
Challenges Faced by Sector
  • Fragmented Supply Chain: The fundamental challenge in dairy is maintaining quality and quantity within a diversified supply base. Due to its perishable nature, dairy requires more complex supply chain operations and logistics to ensure freshness and safety. 
    • The sector also witnesses adulteration practices and overuse of antibiotics to boost production.
  • Price Sensitivity: Milk producers are highly susceptible to even minor shocks.  For instance, small changes in the employment and income of consumers can leave a significant impact on milk demand.
  • Unorganised Nature: The majority of cattle raisers are unorganised unlike sugarcane, wheat, and rice-producing farmers. This nature further inhibits the creation of political clout to advocate for their rights.
  • Data Deficiency: There is no official and periodical estimate of the cost of milk production. Even though, the value of milk produced outweighs the combined value of the output of wheat and rice in India.
  • Poor returns: There is no MSP (Minimum Support Price) for milk unlike 24 major agricultural commodities in the country including wheat and rice. Further, dairy cooperatives are not a preferred choice for landless or small farmers.
    • The cooperatives adopt a fat-based pricing policy which is 20 to 30 % less than the price in the open market. 
    • Further, dairy cooperatives buy more than 75% of milk at its lower price band.
  • Competition from alternatives: The traditional cow and buffalo milk is shunned by some consumers for more eco-friendly alternatives like ‘Soy Milk’ or ‘Almond milk’. They believe that the carbon footprint of plant-based milk products is much lesser than the traditional dairy products.
Impact of Pandemic
  1. First, the threat of disease has restrained the door-to-door sale of liquid milk to households. This has forced the farmers to sell the entire produce to dairy cooperatives at a much lower price.
  2. Second, the lockdown had led to the closure of shops. This has reduced the demand for milk and milk products.  
  3. Third, the severe shortage of fodder and cattle feed has pushed up the input cost.
  4. Fourth, private veterinary services have almost stopped due to Covid-19. This has led to the death of milch animals.
Government Initiatives for the dairy sector in India

The government introduced various initiatives to boost the dairy sector in India. Such as,

  • Rashtriya Gokul Mission: It was launched in 2014 under the National Programme for Bovine Breeding and Dairy Development.
  • Objectives:
    • Development and conservation of indigenous breeds
    • Breed improvement programme for indigenous cattle breeds to improve their genetic makeup and increase the stock
    • Enhancement of milk production and productivity
    • Upgradation of nondescript cattle using elite indigenous breeds like Gir, Sahiwal, Rathi, Deoni, Tharparkar, Red Sindhi and
    • Distribution of disease-free high genetic merit bulls for natural service.
  • The government has launched a Nationwide AI (artificial insemination) program. It targets to augment annual milk productivity from 1,860 kg/per animal to 3,000 kg/per animal upon its completion.
  • The government launched the National Livestock Mission in 2014-15. It broadly covers all the activities required to ensure quantitative and qualitative improvement in livestock production systems and capacity building of all stakeholders. The major objectives of the mission: 
    • Reduce the gap in demand and availability of feed and fodder, 
    • Conservation and improvement of indigenous breeds, 
    • Ensure higher productivity and production in a sustainable and environmentally friendly manner
    • Enhance livelihood opportunities and increase awareness
  • The government established a Dairy Processing & Infrastructure Development Fund (DIDF) in 2017. It aims to modernize the milk processing plants and create additional infrastructure for processing more milk. 
  • The dairy farmers have been included in the Kisan Credit Card (KCC) programme. It provides adequate and timely credit support from the banking system to the farmers for their cultivation and other needs.
  • Similarly, dairying was brought under MGNREGA to compensate farmers for the income loss due to Covid-19.
Suggestions
  • The government should support start-ups that come up with a solution-oriented approach. 
    • For instance, Country Delight is a Haryana-based dairy-tech company that is providing quality milk at consumers’ doorstep. 
    • The milk undergoes 26 quality tests and farmers deliver it directly. This ensures good quality and optimum pricing. 
  • The producers should be given the requisite support to enter into value-added segments such as ice cream, yogurt, cheese, and whey. These segments show profit margins of 20%, which is much higher than the 3-5% margin in the case of simple milk produce.
  • The dairy farmers must be given a stable market and remunerative price for the milk. For the price, a greater weightage should be accorded to the quantity of milk than its fat content.
  • The government should focus on a hub and spoke model. Under this, the main farm (hub) should have all integrated facilities for milking, feed production, and milk processing. 
    • The connected farms (spokes) should have a basic infrastructure for milking and cattle management. The hub should also provide technical, veterinary, and training support to their spokes for inclusive development.
Conclusion

The current situation demands a sustainable development of the dairy sector. This development should be in line with the environmental, nutritional, and socio-economic demands of the country. Government should take robust steps in order to make dairy farming more lucrative for the small and marginalized farmers.

Source:

The Indian Express

Posted in 7 PM, PUBLICTagged

Dairy Sector in India Needs Urgent Attention

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Synopsis:

The second wave of pandemic has brutally impacted the dairy sector. There is a reduction in milk demand along with a shortage of livestock feed. The situation is very grim and requires the adoption of robust measures to support the dairy sector.

Background:
  • In the first wave, agriculture and allied sectors put up a spectacular performance. It showed an annual growth of 3.4 % while the economy contracted by (-)7.2 % in 2020-21. 
  • However, this good performance was not replicated by the dairy sector in the second wave.
About the dairy and livestock sector:
  • In India, around 70 million farm-dependent people are engaged in the dairy and livestock sector. 
    • Further, 7.7 million people are exclusively engaged in the sector. Amongst them, 69% are female which means the sector is a crucial source of women empowerment.
    • The labour force of the sector mainly comprises unpaid female members.
  • In the Gross Value Added (GVA) from agriculture, the livestock sector contributed 28 percent in 2019-20. Further, India witnesses a 6% growth rate in milk production every year.
  • Farmers keep 2-5 milk animals for livelihood which provides great support to them, especially during drought and flood.
Challenges faced by the dairy Sector:
  • Price Sensitivity: Milk producers are highly susceptible to even minor shocks.  For instance, small changes in the employment and income of consumers can leave a significant impact on milk demand.
  • Unorganised Nature: The majority of cattle raisers are unorganised unlike sugarcane, wheat, and rice-producing farmers. This nature further inhibits the creation of political clout to advocate for their rights.
  • Data Deficiency: There is no official and periodical estimate of the cost of milk production. Even though the value of milk produced outweighs the combined value of the output of wheat and rice in India.
  • Poor returns: There is no MSP (Minimum Support Price) for milk unlike 24 major agricultural commodities in the country including wheat and rice. Further dairy cooperatives are not a preferred choice for landless or small farmers.
    • The cooperatives adopt a fat-based pricing policy. It is 20 to 30 % less than the price in the open market. 
    • Further, more than 75 % of the milk bought by dairy cooperatives is at its lower price band.
Adverse impact of Pandemic on the Dairy Sector:
  1. First, the threat of disease has restrained the door-to-door sale of liquid milk to households. This has forced the farmers to sell the entire produce to dairy cooperatives at a much lower price.
  2. Second, the lockdown had led to the closure of shops. This has reduced the demand for milk and milk products.  
  3. Third, the severe shortage of fodder and cattle feed has pushed up the input cost.
  4. Fourth, private veterinary services have almost stopped due to Covid-19. This has led to the death of milch animals.
Steps taken by Government for the Dairy Sector:
  • The government has launched a Nationwide AI (artificial insemination) program. It targets to augment annual milk productivity from 1,860 kg/per animal to 3,000 kg/per animal upon its completion.
  • The dairy farmers have been included in the Kisan Credit Card (KCC) program. It provides adequate and timely credit support from the banking system to the farmers for their cultivation and other needs.
  • Similarly, dairying was brought under MGNREGA to compensate farmers for the income loss due to Covid-19.
Concerns associated with the above steps:
  1. First, there is a shortage of AI technicians in India. In August 2020, the department of animal husbandry reported a requirement of 2.02 lakh technicians. This is when only 1.16 lakh were available.
  2. Second, the dairy cooperatives have not applied for a sufficient number of loans under KCC. As of October 2020, not even one-fourth of the dairy farmers’ loan applications had been forwarded to banks.
  3. Third, the MGNREGA scheme may not be able to provide relief as its budgetary allocation has been curtailed. The budgetary allocation for 2021-22 was curtailed by 34.5 percent in relation to the revised estimates for 2020-21.
Way Forward:
  • The dairy farmers must be given a stable market and remunerative price for the milk. For the price, a greater weightage should be accorded to the quantity of milk than its fat content
  • They must be ensured of an uninterrupted supply of fodder and cattle feed at a reasonable price.
  • The government should also provide a regular supply of veterinary services and medicines to them.

Source: India Express 

Posted in 9 PM Daily Articles, daily news, Daily News Updates, PUBLICTagged

“Classical swine fever” vaccine and “Sheep Pox Vaccine” – Technology transfer done

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What is the News?

ICAR-Indian Veterinary Research Institute has transferred the Technology for the Classical swine fever(CSF) & Sheep Pox Vaccines to M/s Hester Biosciences through Agrinnovate India Limited.

About the technology transfer:

ICAR-IVRI has developed both the CSF vaccine and Sheep pox vaccine. But to provide commercialisation and build sustainable public-private partnerships ICAR-IVRI decided to perform technology transfer. Further, the technology transfer will also help in the following,

  • It will provide the Vaccine at a cheaper price and ensure longer immunity of livestock.
  • It is a great game-changer for the farmers or people involved in animal husbandry practices
 About Classical swine fever(CSF):
  • Classical swine fever(CSF) also known as hog cholera. It is a contagious viral disease of domestic and wild swine(pigs).
  • Caused by: It is caused by a virus of the genus Pestivirus of the family Flaviviridae.
  • Transmission: The most common method of transmission is through direct contact between healthy swine and those infected with the CSF virus.
  • Humans are not affected by this virus. Swine are the only species known to be susceptible.
  • Treatment: The disease has a 100% mortality. However, Vaccination can prevent the spread of the disease.
Vaccine for CSF:
  • In India, the disease is controlled by a lapinized CSF vaccine. This vaccine is produced by killing large numbers of rabbits.
  • To avoid this, the ICAR-IVRI developed a Cell Culture CSF Vaccine (live attenuated). This is developed using the Lapinized Vaccine Virus from a foreign strain.
    • Live attenuated vaccines use a weakened (or attenuated) form of the germ that causes a disease.
  • The new vaccine has been extensively tested for safety and potency. It has been found to induce protective immunity from the 14th day of the Vaccination till 18 Months.
About Sheep Pox Disease:
  • Sheep Pox is a highly contagious viral disease of sheep caused by a poxvirus.
  • The disease is the most severe of all the animal pox diseases. It can result in some of the most significant economic consequences due to poor wool and leather quality.
  • Transmission: The sheep pox virus is an aerosol. So it can be transmitted via contact with an infected animal.
  • Treatment: There is no treatment for the sheep pox virus, thus efforts are directed towards prevention.
Vaccine for Sheep Pox:
  • A live attenuated Sheep Pox Vaccine using indigenous strain was developed by the Institute for preventive vaccination in the sheep population.
  • The Vaccine is safe, potent and immunogenic [efficacious] for sheep aged more than six months of age. Also, it protects the Vaccinated animals for a period of 40 months.
Agrinnovate India Limited:

It is a registered Company under the Companies Act, 1956. The Government of India in the Department of Agricultural Research and Education (DARE) owns it.

Functions:
  • Firstly, it aims to work on the strengths of DARE’s Indian Council of Agricultural Research (ICAR)
  • Secondly, Agrinnovate India also promotes the development and spread of R&D and its outcomes through IPR protection, commercialization and forging partnerships for the public benefit.

Source: PIB

 

Posted in Daily Factly articles, daily news, Daily News Updates, Factly: Science and Technology, PUBLICTagged ,

Union Minister inaugurates “e-SANTA Marketplace”

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What is the News?

The Union Commerce and Industry Minister virtually inaugurated e-SANTA.

About e-SANTA:
  • e-SANTA stands for Electronic Solution for Augmenting NaCSA farmer’s trade-in Aquaculture.
  • Purpose: e-SANTA is an electronic marketplace providing a platform to connect aqua farmers and buyers. Further, The platform will also act as an alternative marketing tool between farmers & buyers by eliminating middlemen.
Benefits of e-SANTA Platform:
  • Firstly, Enhances the life of Farmers: The platform will RAISE the lives & income of farmers by:
    1. Reducing Risk
    2. Awareness of Products & Markets
    3. Increase in Income
    4. Shielding Against Wrong Practice
    5. Ease of Processes.
  • Secondly, Promotes Transparency: The platform promotes transparency as the process is completely paperless and an end-to-end electronic trade between Farmers and exporters.
  • Thirdly, Greater Control: The farmers have the freedom to list their products and quote their price. While the exporters have the freedom to list their requirements and also to choose the products based on their requirements.
  • Fourthly, The platform is available in many languages which will help the local population.
About National Centre for Sustainable Aquaculture(NaCSA):
  • National Centre for Sustainable Aquaculture is an extension arm of Marine Products Export Development Authority (MPEDA), Ministry of Commerce & Industry Govt. of India.
  • Objective: The objectives of NaCSA are to encourage and uplift the small and marginal farmers through the organization of clusters and maintaining Best Management Practices in shrimp culture.

Source: PIB

 

Posted in Daily Factly articles, Factly: Schemes and Programs, PUBLICTagged

“Shaphari Scheme” – Centre to Certify Shrimp Farms

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What is the News? 

Marine Products Export Development Authority(MPEDA) launches a certification scheme for aquaculture called the “Shaphari Scheme”.

About Shaphari Scheme:
  • Shaphari is a Sanskrit word that means the superior quality of fishery products suitable for human consumption.
  • Purpose: It is an Antibiotics free Certification Scheme. It certifies hatcheries and farms for the production of antibiotic-free shrimp products. By doing that, it aims to:
    1. enhance the consumer confidence,
    2. meet international standards
    3. promote hassle-free export
  • Moreover, the entire certification process will be online to minimize human errors and ensure higher credibility and transparency.
  • Based on: The scheme is based on the United Nations’ Food and Agriculture Organization’s technical guidelines on aquaculture certification.
  • Components: The scheme will have two components:
    1. Certifying hatcheries for the quality of their seeds and
    2. Separately approving shrimp farms that adopt the requisite good practices.
  • Significance: The certification of fish hatcheries under the Shaphari Scheme will help farmers easily identify good quality seed producers. Those who successfully clear multiple audits of their operations shall receive a certificate for a period of two years.
Reasons to launch this scheme:
  • Firstly, India is the second-largest fish producer in the world.
  • Secondly, Fish Sector provides employment to 14 million people in harvesting, processing packaging, and distribution.
  • Thirdly, Frozen shrimp is the largest exported item from India. It constitutes 50.58% in quantity and 73.2% in terms of total U.S. dollar earnings from the sector during 2019-20.
  • Fourthly, India exported frozen shrimp worth almost $5 billion in 2019-20 to the U.S. and China — its biggest buyers.
  • Fifthly, Major Producing States: Andhra Pradesh, West Bengal, Odisha, Gujarat, and Tamil Nadu are the major shrimp producing States.
  • However, a combination of factors had hurt export volumes in recent months. This includes container shortages and incidents of rejection of seafood consignments because of food safety concerns. Hence, the scheme was launched.

Source: The Hindu

Posted in Daily Factly articles, Factly: Schemes and Programs, PUBLIC, SCHEMESTagged

Government launches “Madhukranti portal” and “Honey Corners” of NAFED

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What is the News?

The Union Agriculture Minister has launched the “MadhuKranti portal” and “Honey Corners” of NAFED.

About MadhuKranti portal:
  • Madhukranti portal is an initiative of the National Bee Board under the National Beekeeping and Honey Mission.
  • Purpose: The purpose is to develop an online registration to achieve a traceability source of Honey and other beehive products on a digital platform.
  • The portal will enable the consumers/public to know about the source of honey and assure the quality of the products.
About National Beekeeping & Honey Mission(NBHM):”
  • National Beekeeping & Honey Mission(NBHM) was launched by the Ministry of Agriculture and Farmers Welfare as part of the AtmaNirbhar Bharat scheme.
  • Aim: The aim is to promote & develop scientific beekeeping in the country to achieve the goal of ‘Sweet Revolution’.
  • Implementation: The National Bee Board (NBB) will implement the mission. Further, it is a Central Sector Scheme and is 100% funded by the Central Govt.
About Honey Corners:
  • Honey Corners: They are special spaces for the sale of honey. The National Agricultural Cooperative Marketing Federation (NAFED) operates it.
  • Significance: NAFED has developed 14-15 honey corners. NAFED will also develop more honey corners in future. This will promote market support for honey.

About NAFED:

  • National Agricultural Cooperative Marketing Federation(NAFED) is an apex organization of marketing cooperatives for agricultural produce in India.
  • Founded in: It was founded in 1958. It is registered under the Multi-State Co-operative Societies Act, 2002.
  • Objectives:
    • Firstly, to organize, promote and develop marketing, processing and storage of agricultural, horticultural and forest produce.
    • Secondly, to distribute agricultural machinery and other inputs, undertake inter-state, import and export trade, wholesale or retail as the case may be.
    • And lastly, to act and assist with technical advice in agricultural production for the promotion and the working of its members, partners, etc.
  • Programmes:
    • NAFED is the nodal agency to implement price stabilization measures under “Operation Greens”.
    • NAFED along with the Food Corporation of India(FCI) physically procures oilseeds, pulses and copra under the Price Support Scheme(PSS). This in turn is under the umbrella scheme of PM-AASHA

Source: AIR

Posted in Daily Factly articles, Factly: Schemes and Programs, PUBLICTagged

White Revolution in India and Women Empowerment

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Synopsis: Dairy cooperatives models adopted by India during  Operation Flood improved women development in India

Introduction: Women dairy farmers’ contribution to India’s white revolution is immense. That itself is a great reason for India to celebrate Women’s History Month in March.

What is the White revolution?
  1. Firstly, Operation Flood led to the White revolution. It aimed to make India a self-dependent nation in milk production.
  2. Secondly, National Dairy Development Board (NDDB) launched it in 1970. Dr Verghese Kurien is the father of the White Revolution in India.
  3. Thirdly, Operation Flood promoted the AMUL model. Under this model, milk is procured from farmers’ co-operatives. The excess milk is converted to skimmed milk powder and get utilized during the lean season. The milk is distributed through an organized retail network.
  4. Fourthly, so far operation flood is the world’s biggest dairy development program. The Operation flood made India the world’s largest producer of milk.
Role of cooperatives in Operation Flood:

In India Majority of the dairy farmers own only small landholdings(households with two to five cows). But due to the development of co-operatives under Operation Flood, they were able to improve a lot. This includes,

  1. The small dairy farmers were able to avoid middlemen.
  2. They also started getting a guaranteed minimum procurement price for milk.
  3. It enhanced the knowledge and bargaining power of small and marginal farmers.
Achievement of women dairy farmers:

Apart from the general benefits, women dairy farmers achieved many significant achievements. This includes,

  1. According to the latest data, there are more than 1,90,000 dairy cooperative societies across the country. Approximately 6 million of their members are women members.
  2. A study conducted on Women Dairy Cooperative Society (WDCS) members in Rajasthan shows certain striking development among women. Such as,
    1. 31% of the women dairy farmers in Rajasthan converted their mud houses to cement structures.
    2. 39% of women dairy farmers in Rajasthan constructed concrete sheds for their cattle
    3.  Women-led cooperatives provide fertile ground for the capacity building of rural women in a leadership position.
      For example, A woman dairy farmer who not even visited the school joined a Dairy cooperative. Now she is the main breadwinner in her family and bought 25 acres of land with the income she earned through dairy farming.
  3. Apart from that, Women dairy farmers also broke the traditional practices of patriarchal society.

All these developments are demonstrated through the testimonials on International Women’s Day. It was conducted by the Department of Animal Husbandry and Dairying.

Financial success of women-led dairy unions and companies:
  • During the early years of Operation Flood, the National Dairy Development Board worked on setting up women-led producer enterprises. This includes companies like Shreeja Mahila Milk Producer Company. The company started with 24 women, but now it has more than 90,000 members. The company now has a turnover of approximately ₹450 crores/year.
  • In 2019, Amul released a list of 10 women dairy farmers who became a millionaire by selling milk.

The women development achieved by the women dairy farmers in India is huge. They achieved this feat even without getting any formal education.

Conclusion:

A study by the International Development Research Centre (IDRC) indicates that 93% of women who succeeded received both financial support and training. Instead, the success rate is only  57% if they receive financial aid alone.

So the government has to understand this and start providing training to the remaining women dairy farmers. As this will be the only way to improve women’s empowerment.

Source: The Hindu

Posted in 9 PM Daily Articles, PUBLICTagged ,

KVIC launches “Project REHAB”

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What is the News?

Khadi and Village Industries Commission(KVIC) has launched a unique project called Project REHAB (Reducing Elephant – Human Attacks using Bees).

About Project REHAB:
  • Under this project, bee boxes would get used as a fence to prevent the attack of elephants.
  • Aim: The aim is to create “bee-fences” to mitigate human– elephant conflicts in the country. It will reduce the loss of lives of both, humans and elephants.
  • Where was it launched? It was launched as a pilot project at four places. These places are located on the periphery of Nagarhole National Park in Karnataka.
  • Sub Mission: The project has gotten launched as a sub-mission of KVIC’s National Honey Mission.
National Honey Mission:
  • Launched by: Khadi and Village Industries Commission(KVIC)
  • Aim:
    1. To provide sustainable employment and income to rural and urban unemployed youth.
    2. To conserve the honeybee habitat and tapping untapped natural resources.
    3. Moreover, to promote beekeeping for increasing crop productivity and pollination services avenue for beekeepers and farmers.

Source: PIB

 

Posted in Daily Factly articles, Factly: Environment, PUBLICTagged ,

Animal Husbandry Infrastructure Development Fund

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About Animal Husbandry Infrastructure Development Fund

  • Animal Husbandry Infrastructure Development (AHIDF) is a Central Sector Scheme. It was launched by the Ministry of Animal Husbandry, Fisheries, and Dairying.
  • Aim: To facilitate incentivization of investments for
    • Dairy processing and value addition infrastructure
    • Meat processing and value addition infrastructure and
    • Animal Feed Plant.
  • Objectives:
    • To help increase milk and meat processing capacity and increase exports from these sectors
    • To develop entrepreneurship and generate employment
    • It would increase the price realization for the producer
    • To make available quality concentrated animals feed to cattle, buffalo, sheep, goat, pig to poultry.
  • Eligibility: The following entities will be eligible under AHIDF
    • Farmer Producer Organization(FPO)
    • Private companies
    • Individual entrepreneurs
    • Section 8 companies
    • Micro Small and Medium Enterprises.
  • Benefits under the scheme:
    • Loan Contribution: The beneficiaries are to contribute a minimum of 10% margin money as an investment. The balance of 90% would be the loan component to be made available by scheduled banks.
    • Interest Subvention: The Government of India will provide a 3% interest subvention to eligible beneficiaries.
    • Loan Moratorium: There will be a 2 years moratorium period for the principal loan amount and 6 years repayment period thereafter.
    • Credit Guarantee Fund: NABARD would maintain a Credit Guarantee Fund. It would provide a Credit guarantee to those sanctioned projects which are covered under MSME defined ceilings. Guarantee Coverage would be up to 25% of the Credit facility of the borrower.

Source: The Hindu

[Answered] What do you understand by the term ‘right to due process’? Discuss its significance in a democracy.

Posted in Daily Factly articles, daily news, Daily News Updates, Factly - Indian Economy, PUBLIC, SCHEMESTagged

TIFAC launches SAKSHAM Portal and Seaweed Mission

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What is the news?

Technology Information, Forecasting and Assessment Council (TIFAC) celebrated its 34th Foundation Day. The theme of the Foundation day was: “Technology, Innovation and Economy for Atma Nirbhar Bharat”.

About TIFAC:

  • It is an autonomous technology think tank under the Department of Science & Technology (DST), Ministry of Science and Technology. It was set up in 1988.
  • Mandate: TIFAC identifies the technological priorities of the future like cyber-physical systems, quantum computing, green chemistry and water.
  • TIFAC launched 2 initiatives: 1) SAKSHAM Portal, 2)  Seaweed Mission

SAKSHAM Portal:

  • Need of the Portal: The COVID-19 pandemic has compelled the labour force to return to their native lands due to loss of jobs.
  • Aim: It is a dynamic job portal for mapping the skills of Shramiks (labour) vis-à-vis requirements of the MSMEs across the country.
  • Features of the Portal:
    • This portal will facilitate placement of 10 lakh blue-collar jobs by directly connecting Shramiks with MSMEs.
    • It will help eliminate middlemen/ labour contractors. It will also help in the identification of skill proficiency level and development of Skill Cards for Shramik.
    • Likewise, it will also reduce the hardship of Shramiks(labour) in finding jobs in nearby MSMEs.

Seaweed Mission:

Click Here to Read about Seaweed

  • Why was this mission launched? Out of the global seaweed production, China produces 57%, Indonesia 28%. Whereas, India is having a mere share of 0.01-0.02%.
  • Purpose: Under the mission, TIFAC will demonstrate a model for commercial farming of seaweeds, and it’s processing for value addition. It will boost the national economy.
  • Benefits of Cultivating Seaweed:
    • It is estimated that if seaweed cultivation is done in 10 million hectares or 5% of the EEZ area of India, it can provide employment to 50 million people.
    • Additional benefits of Seaweed cultivation;
      • Improves national GDP;
      • improves ocean productivity;
      • Reduce algal blooms and sequester millions of tons of CO2;
      • Create a healthier ocean and can also use to produce bioethanol.

Source: PIB

Posted in Daily Factly articles, daily news, Daily News Updates, Factly - Indian Economy, PUBLICTagged , ,

Bengaluru scientists develop “Arka Shubha variety of Marigold”

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What is the News?

Indian Institute of Horticultural Research(IIHR) has come out with a new variety of Marigold flower called “Arka Shubha variety of Marigold”.

Marigold Flower:

  • It is mostly herbaceous plants belonging to the sunflower family Asteraceae.
  • The flowers are native to the Americas, growing naturally from the southwestern United States into South America. However, some species have become naturalized around the world.

Significance of Arka Shubha variety of Marigold:

  • Generally, flowers lose their value if they get spoiled either due to rain or delay in harvest. However, from this variety, crude carotene can be extracted, even if flowers are spoilt.
  • The Arka Shubha variety of marigold has a carotene content of 2.8%. It is more than other marigold varieties(1.4%) and is also the highest carotene content from a plant source.
  • Carotene is mainly used in the pharmaceutical sector. Presently, India imports most of its carotene from China and other countries.

Other Uses:

  • Ornamental Purposes: These flowers can be sold for ornamental purposes too.
  • Poultry Sector: This variety is of use in the poultry sector as well. Its petals could be used as feed to get quality yolk. It can also be used as feed for sheep too.

Source: The Hindu

Posted in Daily Factly articles, Factly - Indian Economy, PUBLICTagged

What are the benefits of “Seaweed Farming”?

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What is the news?

In Budget 2021, the Finance Minister has proposed to set up a multi-purpose seaweed park in Tamil Nadu. It will be a part of the Seaweed Farming promotion in India.

  • What is Seaweed? It is the name given to the many species of marine algae and plants.  These species grow in water bodies such as rivers, seas and oceans. The practice of cultivating and harvesting seaweed is known as Seaweed Farming.
  • Seaweed Species in India: The commercially exploited seaweed species in India mainly include Kappaphycus alvarezii, Gracilaria edulis, Gelidiella acerosa, Sargassum spp. and Turbinaria spp.
  • Uses of Seaweed Farming:
    • They are rich in vitamins and minerals and are consumed as food in various parts of the world
    • They are used for the production of phytochemicals namely agar, carrageenan, and alginate. These phytochemicals are widely used as gelling, stabilizing, and thickening agents in several industries of food, confectionery, pharmaceutical, etc.
    • Furthermore, they are used for the production of polysaccharides, fertilizer. They are also used in high-value products such as nutraceuticals and cosmeceuticals for use against various lifestyle diseases.

Read about Pradhan Mantri Matsya Sampada Yojana

Modernisation of the fishing harbour 

The Finance Minister has announced modernisation of five fishing harbours.

  • Which are those five fishing harbours? Kochi (Kerala), Chennai (Tamil Nadu) Visakhapatnam (Andhra Pradesh), Paradip (Odisha) and Petuaghat (West Bengal).
  • These fishing harbours will be developed as hubs of economic activity by developing inland fishing and fish-landing centres along the banks of rivers and waterways.

 Source: The Hindu

 

Posted in Daily Factly articles, Factly - Indian Economy, PUBLICTagged ,

Lumpy skin disease in cattle

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News: The Lumpy Skin Disease (LSD) has been detected in Indian bovines in the State of Tamil Nadu.

Facts:

    • Lumpy Skin Disease: It is an infectious disease in cattle caused by a virus of the family Poxviridae, also known as the Neethling virus.
    • Vector: Blood-feeding insects such as mosquitos and flies act as mechanical vectors to spread the disease. The outbreak of the disease is associated with high temperature and high humidity.
    • Origin: Lumpy skin disease was first seen as an epidemic in Zambia in 1929. In India, the case was first reported from Odisha in August 2019 and currently, it has spread to 15 states within just 16 months.
    • Symptoms: The disease is characterized by fever, enlarged superficial lymph nodes and multiple nodules on the skin and mucous membranes. Infected cattle also may develop edematous swelling in their limbs and exhibit lameness.
    • Mortality Rate: Morbidity varies between 2 and 45% and the mortality rate is usually less than 10%.
    • Treatment: There is no treatment for the virus, so prevention by vaccination is the most effective means of control.
    • Implications: The virus has important economic implications since affected animals tend to have permanent damage to their skin, lowering the commercial value of their hide.

Article Source

 

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Union Minister to launch “Khadi Prakritik Paint” developed by KVIC

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News: Union Minister for Road Transport & Highways will be launching an innovative new called “Khadi Prakritik Paint”.

Facts:

  • Khadi Prakritik Paint: It has been conceptualized by the Khadi and Village Industries Commission (KVIC) and later developed by Kumarappa National Handmade Paper Institute, Jaipur (a KVIC unit).
  • Key Characteristics:
    • It is a first-of-its-kind eco-friendly, non-toxic paint with anti-fungal, antibacterial properties.
    • Based on cow dung as its main ingredient, the paint is cost-effective and odorless and has been certified by Bureau of Indian Standards.
    • The paint is free from heavy metals like lead, mercury, chromium, arsenic, cadmium and others.
  • Forms: The paint is available in two forms – distemper paint and plastic emulsion paint.
  • Significance:
    • Production of Khadi Prakritik Paint is aligned with the Prime Minister’s vision of increasing farmer’s income. The paint is estimated to generate additional income of Rs 30,000 (approx) per annum per animal to farmers/ gaushalas.
    • It will be a boost to the local manufacturing and will create sustainable local employment through technology transfer.
    • This technology will increase consumption of cow dung as a raw material for eco-friendly products and will generate additional revenue to farmers and gaushalas. Utilization of cow dung will also clean the environment and prevent clogging of drains.

Article Source

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Karnataka’s cow protection bill

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Context: The Karnataka’s cow protection bill, like similar laws in other states affects rural economy.

Background

  • Recently, Karnataka state’s Vidhan Sabha passed the contentious cattle protection bill that had been passed by the state assembly 10 years ago which could not enter the statute book because the governor refused assent.

What are the issues involved?

  • Lack of debate: The Speaker did not give the opposition adequate time to voice their opinion.
  • Disturbs existing network: The relationship between the farmer and the butcher is threatened as witnessed in similar stares like Uttar Pradesh.
  • Indiscriminate powers to law agency: The proposed law stipulates a prison term of three to five years and fines ranging from Rs 50,000 to Rs 5 lakh for purchasing or disposing of cattle for slaughter and gives the police sweeping powers to search premises and vehicles.
  • Affects farmers whose livelihood is dependent on Livestock: the cow becomes virtually uneconomical for the farmer after eight years when its milk output falls. Also, such animals along with male cattle not required for draught and breeding purposes.
  • Misuse of law: As observed by Allahabad High Court, The Act is being used against innocent persons.
Posted in 9 PM Daily Articles, acts, bills and regulations, daily news, Daily News Updates, PUBLICTagged

E-Gopala App

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  • It is a comprehensive breed improvement marketplace and information portal for direct use of farmers.
  • Features: The app will provide solutions on the aspects of:
    • Managing livestock including buying and selling of disease-free germplasm in all forms (semen, embryos, etc.).
    • Availability of quality breeding services (Artificial Insemination, veterinary first aid, vaccination, treatment, etc.).
    • Guiding farmers for animal nutrition and treatment of animals using appropriate ayurvedic medicine/ethnoveterinary medicine.
    • Providing a mechanism to send alerts and inform farmers about various government schemes and campaigns in the area.
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Pradhan Mantri Matsya Sampada Yojana

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Pradhan Mantri Matsya Sampada Yojana

  • It is a flagship scheme for focused and sustainable development of the fisheries sector in the country as a part of the Atma Nirbhar Bharat Abhiyan.
  • Nodal Ministry: Department of Fisheries, Ministry of Animal Husbandry, Dairying and Fisheries.
  • Aim:
    • Enhance fish production by an additional 70 lakh tonne and increase fisheries export earnings to Rs.1,00,000 crore by 2024-25.
    • Double the incomes of fishers and fish farmers.
    • Reduce post-harvest losses from 20-25% to about 10%.
    • Generate an additional 55 lakhs direct and indirect gainful employment opportunities in the fisheries sector and allied activities.
  • Investment and Duration: An estimated investment of Rs. 20,050 crores for a period of 5 years from financial year (FY) 2020-21 to FY 2024-25 in all States/Union Territories.
  • Components: The scheme has two components — Central Sector Scheme (CS) and Centrally Sponsored Scheme (CSS).
  • Other significant Features:
    • The scheme Adopt ‘Cluster or Area-based Approaches’ and create fisheries clusters through backward and forward linkages.
    • It focuses especially on employment generation activities such as seaweed and ornamental fish cultivation.

Read Also :-Daily Current Affairs news for upsc

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